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Buy Trees Online Guide

Buy Trees Online Guide - A guide to help you buy the right Trees Online

To help you identify the correct trees to buy from our extensive collection of ornamental trees available at http://www.trees-online.co.uk/ we have produced this guide to help you.

In producing this tree guide, we have produced a number of sections to provide you with a range of trees suitable for different situations, one of which will probably match your garden and are available, subject to availability, on the www.trees-online.co.uk website.  It is far from exhaustive list and it must be remembered that many trees will grow happily in a wide range of situations.

Ornamental trees are grown for the beauty of their foliage, bark, spring flowers, berries, or autumn colour.  Their ability to give their best in your garden will be affected by their suitability or otherwise of the situation in which they are planted and the characteristics of your soil.

Small (around 4 metres at 10 years) Evergreen Trees (no conifers)

Arbutus Strawberry tree, spreading with dark brown shredding bark, large dark green leave. Small white flowers, red fruits in Autumn.
Arbutus Unnedo Rubra, spreading form with pink flowers. Medium to dark green leaves.
California Lilac, large blue flowers in spring. Quite a spreading habit but not the hardiest of trees.
Norman Haddon, semi evergreen, white flowers turning to pink and red fruits in Autumn. Slightly taller than wider.
Cotoneaster, large green leaves, red berries, attracts the birds. Most varieties are spreading.
Pineapple Broom, erect shape, pineapple scented cluster. More vase shaped than spreading.
Chilean Firebrush, orange/scarlet flowers,  more vase shaped.
Holy, all types. 
Bay Laurel,  good for cooking. Reasonably wide, typical lollipop tree shape
Chinese Privet, white flowers in Autumn. Typical lollipop tree shape
Photinia Palette, pink tinged new growth, creamy white blotches on leaves. Typical lollipop tree shape.
Photinia Red Robin, toothed leaves, red growing tips, More upright and columnar.
Cherry Laurel and Caucasica, wide spreading shrub, good for screens, small white flowers,
Portugal Laurel,  wide and spreading, small white flowers,

TREES WITH AROMATIC FOLIAGE

Trees with scented foliage or wood often give off their aroma as a result of gentle bruising.  Plant them near paths or heavily used areas, thinking about the direction of the prevailing wind.

Species     Varieties

Eucalyptus (Gum)    all
Juglans (Walnut)    all
Populus (Poplar)    candicans ‘Aurora'

TREES FOR CLAY SOILS

Clay soil is sticky and unworkable when it is wet and as hard as concrete when dry.  However, clay soil is often fertile and if properly worked can provide an excellent home.  Care should be given to providing good drainage.

Acer (Maple)     all
Aesculus (Horse Chestnut)   all
Alnus (Alder)     all
Aronia      all
Betula (Birch)    all
Carpinus (Hornbeam)   all
Cornus (Dogwood)    all
Cotinus     all
Cotoneaster     all
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   all
Eucalyptus (Gum)    all
Fraxinus (Ash)    all
Hammamelis (Witch Hazel)  all
Ilex (Holly)     all
Laburnum      all
Larix (Larch)     all
Magnolia      all
Malus (Crab Apple)    all
Populus (Poplar)    all
Prunus (Cherry)    all
Quercus (Oak)    all
Salix (Willow)    all
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  all
Taxodium (Swamp Cypress)  all
Taxus (Yew)     all
Tilia (Lime)     all

TREES FOR DRY, ACID SOILS

Many treess are well adapted to dry, acid soil which is usually easy to work and has the advantage of being quick to warm up early in the year.  The fertility of acid soils can be improved with the addition of organic matter, so if you are starting a new garden in these conditions, select trees from the list below at the outset then include other trees after a few seasons of soil improvement.  Remember to water trees in well and mulch heavily.

Acer (Maple)     ginnala
Acer (Maple)     negundo and cultivars
Betula (Birch     all
Castanea (Sweet Chestnut)  all
Cercis      all
Cotoneaster     all
Gleditsia (Honey Locust)   all
Ilex (Holly)     aquifolium and culitivars
Ilex (Holly)     crenata and cultivars
Populus (Poplar)    all
Robinia (False Acacia or Locust)  all
Salix (Willow)    all

TREES FOR SHALLOW SOIL OVER CHALK

Chalk soils have a very high lime content so can be harmful to many trees.  That being said, calcium and magnesium limestone in the wild supports a very diverse range of trees, so the gardener need not be entirely defeated by thes conditions.  Chalk is more difficult when there is only a shallow layer of soil above the rock since this leads to soild drying out quickly.  Attempts to fight nature by planting your favourites will almost certainly fail.  The best advice is to go with the flow by choosing from the list of trees below, which are known to be happy in these situations.

Acer (Maple)     campestre
Acer (Maple)     negundo and cultivars
Acer (Maple)     platanoides and cultivars
Acer (Maple)     pseudoplatanus and culitivars
Aesculus (Horse Chestnut)   all
Carpinus (Hornbeam)   betulus and cultivars
Cornus (Dogwood)    Mas and cultivars
Cotoneaster      all
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   all
Euonymus     all
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica and cultivars
Fraxinus (Ash)    all
Prunus (Cherry)    Japanese cherries
Sambucus (Elder)    all
Sorbus (Whitebeam)   aria and cultivars
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  Hybrida and cultivars
Syringa (Lilac)    all
Taxus (Yew)     baccata and cultivars

TREES FOR DAMP SITES

Trees in general require good drainage and locations where soil is not waterlogged.  However there are some which are perfectly adapted to thriving in permanent dampness or even wetness.  Trees such as the Swamp Cypress (Taxodium Dissticum) can survive wet for many months.  However, trees without special adaptations to such environmental conditions might die within a few weeks if they are flooded during the growing season.

Alnus (Alder)     all
Amelanchier     all
Aronia      all
Betula (Birch)    all
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   all
Metasequoia (Redwood)   all
Populus (Poplar)    all
Salix (Willow)    all
Sambucus (Elder)    all
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  aucuparia and cultiviars
Taxodium (Swamp Cypress)  disticum

TREES FOR COLD EXPOSED AREAS

Many of us have become familiar with the idea of a wind chill factor.  This affects trees as much as it does us so finding trees that can withstand icy blasts is important, not least because the soil in such spots is often very cold or even frozen, leaving the tree to struggle for moisture from the ground as it loses extra moisture through its leaves.  Thankfully a good selection of evergreens and many deciduous trees come to our rescue.

Betula (Birch)    most
Cotinus     coggygria and cultivars
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   monogyna and cultivars
Fagus (Beech)    all
Fraxinus (Ash)    excelsior and cultivars
Gingko     biloba
Laburnum     all
Quercus (Oak)    robur and cultivars
Salix (Willow)    all
Sorbus (Whitebeam)   aria and cultivars
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  aucuparia and cultivars
Taxus (Yew)     baccata and cultivars

PLANTING BY THE SEASIDE

As well as coping with more wind and higher average temperatures than those inland, seaside gardens need to cope with the high salt content of the air and soil.  Trees with tough, waxy leaves and grey foliage often withstand seaside conditions well.

Acer (Maple)     pseudoplatanus
Arbutus (Strawberry)   unedo and cultivars
Castanea (Sweet Chestnut)  sativa
Cotoneaster      many
Eucalyptus (Gum)    all
Fraxinus (Ash)    excelsior and cultivars
Ilex (Holly)     aquifolim and cultivars
Quercus (Oak)    ilex
Quercus (Oak)    robur
Salix (Willow)    most
Sorbus (Whitebeam)   aria and cultivars
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  aucuparia and cultivars

TREES FOR SHADY SPOTS

There are a very few trees which will tolerate deep shade since their instincts are to grow up to the light.  However, since most gardens have shady spots the trees which will thrive there are especially valuable.

Acer (Japanese Maple)   palmatum and cultivars
Cornus (Dogwood)    mas and mas ‘Variegata'
Hamamelis (Witch Hazel)   all
Ilex (Holly)     aquifolium and cultivars
Prunus (Laurel)    laurocerasus and cultivars
Prunus (Laurel)    lustianica and cultivars
Taxus (Yew)     all

TREES OF WEEPING OR PENDULOUS HABIT

When planning a garden we often seek as much variety as possible.  So, whislt many trees are characterised by a form which has branches reaching upwards, it is pleasing to find others which depart from this to provide the contrast we need.

Acer (Maple)     saccharinum
Cotoneaster     Hybridus Pendula
Euonymus     europaeus ‘Red Cascade'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Purpurea Pendula'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Pendula')
Malus (Crab Apple)    sun rival
Morus (Mulberry)    alba ‘Pendula'
Prunus (Cherry)    ‘Cheal's Weeping'
Pyrus (Pear)     salicifolia ‘Pendula'
Salix (Willow)    x sepulcratis ‘Chrysocoma'

TREES OF UPRIGHT OR FASTIAGATE HABIT

Trees of this shape are especially useful in the smaller garden since they take up less space and cast a smaller shadow.  They also form an excellent contrast with other trees.

Amelanchier     alnifolia Obelisk
Carpinus (Hornbeam)   betulus ‘Frans Fontaine'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Dawyck Gold'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Dawyck Purple'
Fraxinus (Ash)    ornus ‘Obelisk'
Liriodendron (Tulip)    tulipifera ‘Fastiagatum'
Malus (Crab Apple)    ‘Admiration'
Malus (Crab Apple)    ‘Red Obelisk'
Malus (Crab Apple)    trilobata ‘Guardsman'
Prunus (Cherry)    Amanogawa
Prunus (Cherry)    Shosar
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  ‘Autumn Spire'
Ulmus (Elm)     monor Dampierie ‘Wredei'

TREES WITH ORNAMENTAL BARK AND TWIGS

We are used to thinking of planting trees for their flower and foliage, but many have attractively coloured or peeling or patterned bark, or throw out particularly colourful new growth.

Acer (Maple)     capillipes
Acer (Maple)     davidii ‘George Forrest'
Acer (Maple)     griseum
Acer (Maple)     rufinerve
Betula (Birch)    most
Castanea (Sweet Chestnut)  sativa
Eucalyptus (Gum)    most
Fraxinus (Ash)    excelsior ‘Aurea Pendula' Jaspidea
Metasequoia (Redwood)   glyptostroboides all
Parrotia     persica
Platanus (Lime)    all
Prunus (Cherry)    rufa
Prunus (Cherry)    serrula
Salix (Willow)    most cultivars
Taxodium (Swamp Cypress)  disticum

TREES GROWN FOR THEIR FOLIAGE (LARGE OR SHAPED)

After the form of the tree, it is perhaps through foliage that we can best create the design feel we seek in our gardens.  Large or interestingly shaped leaves create new points of interest and emphasis in the following:

Catalpa (Indian Bean)   all
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   arnoldiana
Gingko     biloba
Liriodendron (Tulip)    tulipifera all
Malus (Crab Apple    ‘Profusion Improved', transitoria
Paulownia     all
Platanus (Lime)    all
Quercus (Oak)    rubra
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  ‘Chinese Lace'
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  folgneri ‘Lemon Drop'
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  scalaris

TREES FOR AUTUMN COLOUR

Acer (Maple)     campestre
Acer (Maple)     capillipes
Acer (Maple)     ginnala ‘Flame'
Acer (Maple)     platanoides, most
Acer (Maple)     rubrum
Acer (Maple)     rufinerve
Amelanchier     most
Betula (Birch)    most
Carpinus (Hornbeam)   all
Cornus (Dogwood)    florida and cultivators
Cotoneaster     horizontalis
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   pedicellata
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   prunifolia
Euonymus     europaeus and cultivars
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica, sylvatica ‘Asplenifolia'
Fraxinus (Ash)    all
Gingko     all
Hamamelis (Witch Hazel)   all
Larix (Larch)     all
Liquidamber (Sweet Gum)   all
Malus (Crab Apple)    toringoides, ‘Scarlet'
Malus (Crab Apple)    transitoria
Malus (Crab Apple)    trilobata
Metasequoia (Redwood)   all
Morus (Mulberry)    alba ‘Pendula'
Nyssa (Tupelo)    all
Parrotia      persica all
Prunus (Cherry)    Beni Yutaka
Prunus (Cherry)    most Japanese forms
Prunus (Cherry)    sargentii
Prunus (Cherry)    ‘Snow Goose'
Pyrus (Pear)     ‘Chanticleer'
Quercus (Oak)    rubra
Robinia (False Acacia or Locust)  pseudoacacia ‘Frisia'
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  ‘Autumn Spire'
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  most
Taxodium (Swamp Cypress)  all

TREES WITH RED OR PURPLE FOLIAGE

The rich colours of these trees can make a striking contribution to any garden.  However, in small gardens the tempatation should be resisted to plant more than one.  These coloured leaves are often seen at their best with the sun behind them so its is worth trying to find a site for them where they will be between you and the sun as you walk along a path, relax, or potter.

Acer (Japanese Maple)   ‘Garnet' palmatum
Acer (Japanese Maple)   ‘Tamukeyama'
Acer (Maple)     platanoides ‘Crimson King'
Catalpa (Indian Bean)   x erubescens ‘Purpurea'
Corylus (Hazel)    avellana ‘Red Majestic'
Corylus (Filbert)    maxima ‘Purpurea' (Red Filbert)
Cotinus      coggygria ‘Royal Purple'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Dawyck Purple'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica Purpurea Group
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Riversii'
Malus (Crab Apple) ‘Liset',‘ Prairie Fire', ‘Profusion', ‘Royal Beauty', ‘Royalty', ‘Rudolph' and ‘Scarlet'
Photinia (Red Robin) x fraseri ‘Red Robin'
Prunus (Plum) x blireana
Prunus (Cherry) cerasifera pissardi ‘Nigra'
Prunus (Cherry) x cistena ‘Crimson Dwarf'
Prunus (Cherry) ‘Royal Burgundy'
Sambucus (Elder) nigra ‘Black Beauty', ‘Black Lace'

TREES WITH GOLDEN OR YELLOW FOLIAGE

One or two well-placed, well-chosen trees from this group, especially in a dull corner can transform a garden by suffusing it with a different kind of light.  However, as with purple foliage, resist the temptation to overdo it.

Acer (Maple)     negundo ‘Kelly's Gold'
Acer (Maple)     platanoides ‘Princeton Gold'
Acer (Maple)     pseudoplatanus ‘Worley'
Betula (Birch)    pendula ‘Golden Beauty'
Catalpa (Indian Bean)   bignonoides ‘Aurea'
Corylus (Hazel)    avellana ‘Aurea'
Fagus (Beech)    sylvatica ‘Dawyck Gold'
Fraxinus (Ash)    excelsior ‘Aurea Pendula'
Gleditsia (Honey Locust)   triacanthos ‘Sunburst;
Metasequoia (Redwood)   glyptostroboides ‘Goldrush'
Robinia (False Acacia or Locust)  pseudoacacia ‘Frisia'
Tilia (Lime)     ‘Wratislaviennsis' (Golden)
Ulmus (Elm)     minor Dampieri ‘Wredei'

TREES WITH GREY OR SILVER FOLIAGE

Grey, silver and blue foliage makes for a subtle range of tones and contrasts.  Many trees with silver or grey foliage are able to withstand dry conditions, as the hairs or waxy coatings which give them their colour are usually there to help minimise water loss.

Crataegus (Hawthorn)   orientalis
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   schraderiana
Eucalyptus (Gum)    gunnii
Eucalyptus (Gum)    niphophilia
Pyrus (Pear)     nivalis, ‘Catalia'
Pyrus (Pear)     salicifolia ‘Pendula'
Sorbus (Whitebeam)   aria ‘Lutescens'
Sorbus (Mountain Ash or Rowan)  folgneri ‘Lemon Drop'

TREES WITH DRAMATIC PINK FOLIAGE IN SPRING

After the long weeks of winter there are few things more welcome than the colours of spring.  The following trees will lift spirits with brilliant pink-tinged foliage.

Acer (Maple)     pseudoplatanus ‘Brilliantissimum'
Acer (Maple)     ‘Prinz Handjery'
Aesculus (Horse Chestnut)   x neglecta ‘Erythroblastos'

TREES WITH VARIEGATED FOLIAGE

As with strong foliage colours, trees with variegated foliage work best in the garden when there are few of them.  They are at their most effective when grown apart from others so that their canopies are low and not too far from eye level.

Acer (Maple)     negundo ‘Elegans', ‘Flamingo'
Acer (Maple)     platanoides ‘Drummondi'
Acer (Maple)     ‘Simon-Louis Freres'
Cornus (Dogwood)    florida ‘Rainbow'
Ilex (Holly)     many cultivars
Liriodendron (Tulip)    tulipifera ‘Aureamarginatum'
Photinia      davidiana ‘Palette'
Populus (Poplar)    candicans ‘Aurora'

TREES WITH FRUIT TO ATTRACT WILDLIFE

Fruit of this kind is often not only very pleasing to look at but forms the attraction for a wide variety of wild life.  Yellow or amber berries often last longer than red ones, as they are not as attractive to birds.  White forms, such as those of Sorbus hupehensis, are often the longest lasting of all.

Arbutus (Strawberry)   all
Castanea (Sweet Chestnut)  sativa
Catalpa (Indian Bean)   bignonoides
Cornus (Dogwood)    kousa chinensis
Cornus (Dogwood)    mas
Cotoneaster      all
Crataegus (Hawthorn)   most
Davidia (Dove)    involucrate
Euonymus  europaeus, europaeus ‘Red Cascade'
Halesia     all
Ilex (Holly)     aquifolium ‘Argenta marginata'
Ilex (Holly)     ‘Handsworth New Silver'
Ilex (Holly)     aquifolium ‘JC Van Tol'
Juglans (Walnut)    nigra
Juglans (Walnut)     regia
Koelreuteria (Golden Rain)   paniculata
Malus (Crab Apple) The majority of varieties fruit well, see the Crab Apple section for details .
Morus (Mulberry) alba ‘Pendula'
Prunus (Cherry) padus ‘Waterii'
Sorbus (Whitebeam/Mountain Ash) The majority of varieties fruit well, see the Mountain Ash and Whitebeam sections for details

TREES WITH SCENTED FLOWERS

The best gardens feed all of the senses and choosing trees with scented flowers can make a huge contribution to this process.

It is worth noting that a high percentage of those in flower in winter are scented, so if you plan to have flowers in winter, you will enjoy scent as well.  Plant them near paths or sitting area or the boundaries of the garden from which the prevailing wind comes.

Aesculus (Horse Chestunt)   hippocastanum
Hamameils (Witch hazel)   intermedia and cultivars
Heptacodium     miconoides
Laburnum     ‘Vossii'
Magnolia     wilsonii
Malus (Crab Apple)    all
Prunus (Cherry)    ‘Amanogawa', ‘Fragrant Cloud'
Prunus (Laurel)    lusitanica and cultivars
Prunus (Cherry)    padus ‘Waterii'
Prunus (Cherry)    x yedoensis and cultivars
Robinia (False Acacia or Locust)  pseudocacacia ‘Frisia'
Robinia (False Acacia or Locust)  x margarette ‘Pink Cascade'
Syringa (Lilac)    vulgaris and cultivars
Wisteria     all      

                                                               

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